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The tips listed here are delivered as is and there are no garantees as to the suitablity of any for any purpose.

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Last Updated - Friday, October 4, 2003, 02:43 PM
MICROSOFT = Most Intelligent Costumers Realise Our Software Only Fools Teenagers
Internet Cache
Windows 98/Me

As you browse the net, Internet Explorer saves the images and pages displayed to your hard drive so that you can quickly load them next time you visit a page. A lot of pages are updated on a regular basis so the copy on the hard drive becomes out of date and useless. These files are stored in C:\Windows\Temporary Internet Files. You should therefore flush the contents of this directory on a regular basis as follows.

  • Right-click on the Internet Explorer icon on your desktop and select "Properties"
  • Click on the "General" tab
  • Click on the "Delete Files" in the "Temporary Internet Files" areas and follow the prompts

Library Not Registered
Windows 98

This means that one, or more, of the support files used by the software is not
registered with Windows.  Although a file may be on your hard disk, Windows
will not recognize that the file is there until it is registered with Windows. The
software installation program automatically registers all relevant files. However,
the registration does not always work. The most common cause of this problem
is the registry file getting damaged by fragmented files.

The first thing to try is defragmenting your hard disk and then re-installing the software.
If defragmenting and re-installing does not work, make a note of the file identified as not
being registered. Go to a DOS prompt and type:  CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM And push
enter. This will put you into the Windows\System folder.  Next type: REGSVR32.EXE,
a space and then the name of the file identified as not being registered. REGSVR32.EXE
is a utility supplied by Microsoft that was included with Windows to solve this problem.


Send To
Windows 98/Me

If you want to use the same application to open multiple file types or use multiple applications to open the same file type, you can achieve this via the Windows "Send To" option. For example, you may prefer WordPad to Notepad for text files or Adobe Photoshop to Paint for bitmaps.

  • Via My Computer, open "C:\Windows\Send To" and keep this window open
  • In this example find Wordpad.exe using Start -> Find -> Files or folders for Win98 or Start -> Search -> For Files or Folders for WinMe
  • Once found it should be in the C:\Program Files\Accessories directory
  • Right-click on the file and choose " Create Shortcut" from the options. It will create a shortcut on the Windows Desktop
  • Right-click on the new Desktop shortcut and rename it to "Wordpad"
  • Right-click on the shortcut again and select "Copy"
  • Switch back to the "C:\Windows\Send To" window and right-click "Paste"
  • This creates a shortcut to "WordPad" in the "Send To" directory. You can delete the one on the Desktop.
Now, find a suitable text file, right-click on it, choose "Send To" from the options listed and you should see "WordPad" in the list displayed.

Shutdown & Restart
Windows 9x
Note: I think the procedure is a little bit different in win95 ask on bsrf's message board (blacksun.box.sk) or on SWG's message board (www.securitywriters.org).

Restarting windows

  • right click anywhere on the desktop (except on the icons) and select new->shortcut
  • choose all the necessary options and in the "command line" box type this:
  • C:\Windows\rundll.exe user.exe,exitwindowsexec
    where the "C:\Windows" is your Windows path.
  • note: this restarts windows without any warning
Shutdown
  • right click anywhere on the desktop (except on the icons) and select new->shortcut
  • choose all the necessary options and in the "command line" box type this:
  • C:\Windows\rundll.exe user.exe,exitwindows
    where the "C:\Windows" is your Windows path.
  • note: this shutdowns windows without any warning
note: "choosing the necessary options" means giving a friendly name to the shortcut like "restart win" for restart or "shutdown win" for the shutdown procedure. 
Sort by Name
Windows 98/Me

When you install new programs or add new "Favorites" via Internet Explorer you'll find there added to the bottom of the appropriate lists. This can be annoying and many users prefer to arrange them alphabetically for easy reference.

Click on Start -> Programs and then right-click. One of the options available towards the bottom is "Sort by Name". Choosing this will re-order the items in the currently displayed list. Doing the same with the Internet Explorer Favourites list results in the same.


Start Menu clutter
Windows 98/Me

With the current size of hard disks and number of programs that people tend to have installed at any one time ever increasing, the Windows "Start Menu" can get very "cluttered", often overlapping to multiple columns. The reason for this is that every program you install includes an entry for the "Start Menu".

Some of the better installation methods help because they allow you to choose the location within the "Start Menu" but this is the exception rather than the norm. You have to set this up before you can make best use of it though.

  • Double-click on "My Computer" or "Windows Explorer" and open the "C:\" drive folder
  • Open the "Windows" folder and click on "Show Files" to display the contents of this folder
  • Open the "Start Menu" and then "Programs" folders
  • Create a new folder in the "Programs" folder, calling it what ever is appropriate (ie, Games).
  • If you have programs already installed and want to move them just drag the folders they are in into the new folder you created (left click once on the folder name - holding the button down - and move it over the new folder name)
When you install new software, navigate back to C:\Windows\Start Menu\Programs as described above and move any new folders added in the same way.If you follow the instructions above, all it does is move the shortcuts for a program - it doesn't affect the program itself. If you un-install the program at a later date - you must remember to delete the folder from the location you moved it to above.

Windows "Temp" directory
Windows 98/Me

As with browsing the internet, another area that can fill up over time if left unchecked is the C:\Windows\Temp directory. This is where Windows stores temporary files from archives (such as zip files), documents, etc as you work on them. Therefore you need to look at the dates of the items in this areas and decide if they're needed. In general if they're older than a week you won't need them.  I have found that you can delete the contents of this folder without any problems.   This can be done by simply navigating to the windows temp folder and pressing Ctrl->A. this will select all the items in the folder and then press delete.


Windows Update
Windows 9x

Use windows update without registering windows update is a cool win98 (you can run it and leave it and it will search for new drivers updates... on the internet) feature but you have to register windows if you want to use it. Not so good after all huh? Well we are mean and we found a trick for bypassing the registration process:

  • Open regedit (start->run and type regedit).
  • Find the key:

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Welcome\RegWiz
  • If this key doesn't exist create it (right click on the key from the upper list that you have and select new->key).
  • Find the string value RegDone.
  • If it doesn't exist create it (right-click on the right pane and select new->string value).
  • Change it's value to 1.
  • Refresh the registry (hit f5) and restart the computer.
  • Run windows update, it shouldn't ask you to register anymore!

Outlook 2000
Windows 98/Me

Saving/Restoring your Contacts
When you re-install Windows and therefore Office 2000, one of the problems you face is keeping your list of "Contacts", containing all your E-mail addresses, telephone numbers, etc for the people you want to keep in touch with. Here's how to do it.

  • Click on File -> Import and Export from the menu bar to invoke the Import and Export Wizard.
  • Click on Export to a file then Next.
  • Click on Personal Folder File (.pst) then Next.
  • Click on Contacts then Next.
  • Choose a suitable file name and location, such as C:/My Documents/contacts.pst then Finish.
  • Choose a meaningful name in the resulting window and your contacts have now been saved and can be transferred to another hard drive or floppy disc for safe keeping.
To restore your contacts
  • click on File -> Import and Export from the menu bar to invoke the Import and Export Wizard.
  • Click on Import from aother program or file then Next.
  • Scroll down to and click on Personal Folder File (.pst) then Next.
  • Choose the location and filename of your contacts file such as C:/My Documents/contacts.pst then click on Next.
  • Click on Contact then Finish and your contacts should now have been restored.
Saving/Restoring your old E-mail
As well as saving your Contacts as described above, you can also save  and restore your current E-mail.
  • Click on File -> Import and Export from the menu bar to invoke the Import and Export Wizard.
  • Click on Export to a file then Next.
  • Click on Personal Folder File (.pst) then Next.
  • Click on Inbox and ensure the "Include subfolders" box has a tick in it then Next.
  • Choose a suitable file name and location, such as C:/My Documents/inbox.pst then Finish.
  • Choose a meaningful name in the resulting window and your contacts have now been saved and can be transferred to another hard drive or floppy disc for safe keeping.

Outlook Express
Windows 98/Me/Win2K/XP

Address Book
If you upgrade your PC's operating system or change PC's and use Microsoft's Outlook Express as your main E-mail program you'll want to save the contents of your Address Book, which contains all your Names, E-mail addresses, etc. The easiest way to do this is to locate and copy the *.wab file onto another hard drive or floppy disk. Thanks go to John Taves for this.

  • First locate the *.wab file(s).
  • For Win2K/XP users the location is
  • C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\Application Data\Microsoft\Address Book, where <username> is the name of the person currently logged on to the system.
  • For Win9x/Me users the location is
  • TBA
Alternatively, you can try and find the *.wab file(s) yourself.
  • Clicking on Start -> Search (or Find) and entering *.wab as the item to find.
  • Open the location where the *.wab file is located in My Computer.
  • Left-click on it to highlight it.
  • Choose Edit -> Copy from the Menu at the top.
  • In My Computer, locate the folder on your other hard drive or floppy disk where you want to save it.
  • Click on Edit -> Paste from the Menu at the top.
To restore it in your new system or updated system simply copy and paste as above, reversing the locations 
Registry

Sound -- Windows 98/Me

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\AppEvents\Schemes\Apps

  • Right click the apps folder and create a new key.
  • Give it the same name as the application that you want to create sound events for.
  • Right click the folder just named and create a new key.
  • Give it the name of the event to which the sound occurs. The Default subkey is a list of predefined events.
  • Right click the folder just named again and create a key named (.Current) (do not include the parentheses). Double click the default value in the right window and add the path of the wave file to the dialog box that pops up.
  • If the wave file is to big this hack wont work.

Desktop/MyDocuments folder

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders

  • Double click on the personal value and change the path to the path of the new My Documents folder.
  • Create a new string called desktop and change the value to the path of the new desktop folder.
  • Reboot.
Print directory contents to file

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Folder\shell

  • Create a new key called PrintDir.
  • Create a new key in the newly created key called Command.
  • Select the command key and change the default value to the name of the string (PT.BAT) (with out the parentheses).
  • Make a batch file mamed PT.BAT and include the following in the file.
  • @echo off
    dir %1 >c:\windows\temp\test.fil
    notepad c:\windows\temp\test.fil
    echo on
  • Save this in the windows directory.
  • Set the properties of this file to program/run/minimized and program/close on exit.
  • This hack demonstrates how to add an item to the menu list in explorer.


Sources

Pacmans Portal - http://www.pacs-portal.co.uk/index.htm
http://www.securitywriters.org/texts.html